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Catalog of the Shakespeare Art Collection  --  Shakespeare Rummy Deck
Index of Plays    -    Index of Suits    -    Alphabetic Index of Characters

Shakespeare Rummy Deck Book of Descriptions by Hannah Tompkins

 

 

 

Jacques - As You Like It --from Shakespeare Rummy Deck by Hannah Tompkins

 

 

Alphabetical listing of character descriptions

Jacques: Symbol for Fools   "As You Like It"
He is really a Lord attending the banished Duke but his caustic wit puts him in the class of Fools. Despite his title he lacks nobility in his make-up, hence the earthy background and jacket trimmed in the yellow green of mischief, like his cuffs. The red brim and upper sleeves disclose his impetuosity, but the darker side of his personality is revealed in the gray cape covering honor and title. The blue-green sleeves expose his ego and cynicism. The jester's cuff circles a hand clutching arrows, symbolic of his sharp wit and thorny jibes as he rails on the world in eloquent declamation. The broken arrow; testimony of his disillusion and weariness. But when he meets 'Touch', a genuine Fool, his battery gets a sudden charge! Quoth he: "O that I were a fool! I am ambitious for a motley coat." 'Tis not so simple to be a Fool...Some have it, some don't.

 

 

Juliet - Romeo & Juliet --from Shakespeare Rummy Deck by Hannah Tompkins

   

Juliet: "Romeo & Juliet"
A true heroine, an incomparable lover, a unique and beautiful person Her bodice of purity is trimmed in nobility (not 'title') as is her skirt. Her heart was as full as her sleeves, with trust, truth and kindness, tied with ribbons of passion and love, like the rich bloom in her hand. Over the other arm hangs the green robe of friendship lined with loyalty. The domed hat sets off her sweet smiling face like an angels crown as the veils form a halo. She is bright as the golden background but black death is already embracing her. The excessive stitching implies parental domination and social impositions which tear her apart. It takes strength and courage even to die...especially for love; Good bye Juliet, Good bye beautiful person.

 

 

 

Kent - King Lear --from Shakespeare Rummy Deck by Hannah Tompkins

  Alphabetical listing of character descriptions

Kent: Symbol for Truth Tellers"King Lear"
An Earl at court, and like his father a true friend and kin to the King. His virtue is seen in the blue upper ground and his pride in the blue-green base. Modesty and sincerity are noted in the brown cowl and tunic, and hunter's cap, banded in loyalty blue, like the trim on his skirt and sleeve. His ardor for truth and justice is indicated by the red sleeves trimmed in honesty and fellowship, and also in the shield with the insignia of equity. His jerkin bears the truth emblem covering doubt and banded in the pink of benevolence. The black shoulder guards signify his banishment by a king he loves and follows in disguise, in filial devotion. The bow and arrows symbolize the hunter in pursuit of truth, even tho his declaration of it put him out of favor. A jewel of a man! Faithful, devoted, and staunch. He had a spiritual and moral strength that commands admiration. He was so strong, in fact, you couldn't put a dent in Kent!

 

 

King Lear - King Lear --from Shakespeare Rummy Deck by Hannah Tompkins

 

 

 

King Lear: Symbol for Royalty"King Lear"
A no-nonsense sovereign adorned with all the imperial trappings of crown, sceptre, and shield with its crown topped globe. His majesty is further fortified by the gold chain around his neck, the chest sash and impressive royal purple belt of willfulness. "Every inch a King.." The robe, splendid and flowing, is of prophetic black with designs of blue and brown: righteousness and sincerity. (It is this robe he gives to naked Edgar, as Mad-Tom in the hovel.) The red ground describes his passion, both in anger and ultimate parental love which he comes to understand thru suffering and humility as seen in the horizontally striped shirt and streamers under the robe. We all live and learn...even kings attend the school of hard knocks. Leer paid his tuition but got no diploma. He got a royal burial instead.

 

Copyright © 1976 Hannah Tompkins. All rights reserved.

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