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Catalog of the Shakespeare Art Collection  --  Shakespeare Rummy Deck
Index of Plays    -    Index of Suits    -    Alphabetic Index of Characters

Shakespeare Rummy Deck Book of Descriptions by Hannah Tompkins

 

 

 

Friar Laurence - Romeo & Juliet --from Shakespeare Rummy Deck by Hannah Tompkins

 

 

Alphabetical listing of character descriptions

Friar Laurence: Symbol for Evil-Doers   "Romeo & Juliet"
Often mistaken for a helpful, holy man, his actions do not stand up under scrutiny. He lies, deceives and manipulates, and in his fear and weakness he betrays and abandons Juliet. Lacking in moral and/or religious convictions, he turns to potions, as seen in his hands, instead of being direct and honest. The clouded gray background shows his cowardice and subversiveness, covered by monastic windows . The prison stripes on the floor suggest his obeisance to the ruling class. The dark robe signifies his shadowy secrets. His cowl is cold, steel blue like his heart. The omen of death trims the cowl, robe and sleeves and the black shroud hangs over his arm. His visage is stealthy and surreptitious.
"Let's face it...the Monk is a punk and half-baked friar!"

 

 

Gertrude - Hamlet --from Shakespeare Rummy Deck by Hannah Tompkins

  Alphabetical listing of character descriptions

Gertrude: Symbol for Royalty"Hamlet"
A lustful Queen, without scruples. Royal pomp and luxury is quite her thing, as confirmed by the heavy, ornate crown; purple skirt with its prominent crest, and opulent flowing robes. Her blue-green bodice betrays her vanity, trimmed in passion. The veils, horizontally striped, are the brand of wantons & strumpets. The regal pendant hangs on a black cord of doom. Her sash of greed and vanity is decorated with peacock 'eyes'. She holds the fatal goblet, intended for her son, Hamlet, but which unknowingly quenches her thirst and life. Her sensuous face is sad and full of foreboding. Marrying the murderer of one's husband..."Well, it's dirty! Gertie, what did you expect?"

 

 

 

Hamlet - Hamlet --from Shakespeare Rummy Deck by Hannah Tompkins

  Alphabetical listing of character descriptions

Hamlet: Symbol for Lovers"Hamlet"
A literary and psychiatric enigma, he could fit into ANY category, but he is first and above all a Lover. He loved life with a passion. The blue background marks his integrity but the barred, ominous castle stands as a threat. His intense, sensitive face is focus in contemplation on the point of the fatal dagger. his sleeve, tho of goodness, is covered with arrows of revenge and cuffed in black. His jerkin of truth is buttoned in sincerity and belted in constancy. The black and white stitches: hope and despair. The doublet is collared in friendship-green and red desire. The black fool's cape of mortality covers a mantle divided into hate and intrigue, behind a quartered shield, marked by a black crown, his fatal legacy; the heart of truth, and opposing diagonals, symbolizing his split personality and inner conflicts. Hamlet, the Lon Chaney of Shakespeare: Lover, Fool, Prince, Fated-One, Evil-Doer, Truth-Teller and Good-Person. Farewell, sweet Prince, and fear not...they'll NEVER psyche you out!

 

 

Horatio - Hamlet --from Shakespeare Rummy Deck by Hannah Tompkins

 

 

 

Horatio: Symbol for Good People"Hamlet"
Hamlet's truest friend, he personifies goodness as well as the other fine human attributes of wisdom, intelligence, loyalty and noble ness. The blue hat and shirt signify his constancy; the olive green ground, his friendship and the yellow shawl his honesty. His earthy jacket is belted by a strong will. The vertical stripes on his jacket and pants indicate his uprightness. The red sleeve of passion with the wide black band marks his mourning the loss of Hamlet. The book shows his wisdom. His head is turned surveying the past. He is the one elected to perpetuate the tragic tale. "Tell it like it is, Horatio!"

 

Copyright © 1976 Hannah Tompkins. All rights reserved.

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