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Catalog of the Shakespeare Art Collection  --  Shakespeare's Lovers, Lusters & Losers

 

Shakespeare's Lovers, Lusters & Losers by Hannah Tompkins

Shakespeare's
Lovers, Lusters & Losers

by Hannah Tompkins
Mixed Media on Brown Paper: conte crayon, chalk, crayon, watercolor and ink. 9-1/2" x 12".

 

Shakespeare's Losers by Hannah Tompkins

 

Losers: Richard III & Anna - King Richard III - Act I sc. ii --by Hannah Tompkins
Richard III & Anna
King Richard III - Act I sc. ii

 

Losers: Othello & Desdemona - Othello - Act V sc. i --by Hannah Tompkins
Othello & Desdemona
Othello - Act V sc. i

 

Losers: Coriolanus & Virgilia - Coriolanus - Act V sc. iii --by Hannah Tompkins
Coriolanus & Virgilia
Coriolanus - Act V sc. iii

 

Losers: Macbeth & Lady Macbeth - Macbeth - Act IV sc. iii --by Hannah Tompkins
Macbeth & Lady Macbeth
Macbeth - Act IV sc. iii

 

Losers: Brutus & Portia - Julius Caesar - Act II sc. i --by Hannah Tompkins
Brutus & Portia
Julius Caesar - Act II sc. i

 

 

Illustrated:
Richard III & Anne (R.III)
Othello & Desdemona (0TH)
Coriolanus & Virgilia (COR)
Macbeth & Lady Macbeth (MAC) Brutus & Portia ( JC )
Others:
Romeo & Juliet (R&J)
Hamlet & Ophelia (HAML)
Hotspur & Lady Percy (H. IV Pt. 1)
Antony & Cleopatra (A&C)

 

Losers

Philosophically, we are all losers, in one way or another. Some are born so, others fall into the pit accidentally while still others are pushed in, by Destiny, circumstances or by devious manipulators.

Every loss is painful, be it a crown, a reputation or a friend. But the most difficult to reconcile is the irrevocable loss of a love and lovers. The above list is drawn from this last group.

In Shakespeare there is a wide range of such losses and just as varied are the causes. According to his own confession, Shakespeare's Richard III was a born loser, a condition that was aggravated by his lust for power. This could also apply to Macbeth, who, despite his rise to the crown, was like Richard a born loser, although it's easy to blame the witches.
Othello was pushed in by jealousy: Coriolanus was tripped by his own pride, and Brutus' plunge was an accident, blinded as he was by the phantom of 'honor'.

They were losers all, who made the final surrender through violence, murder, assassination, suicide or madness. Yet, the loves that were shared were meaningful to the lovers, therefore tragic for its losers..


Copyright © 1982 Hannah Tompkins. All rights reserved.
 

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